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Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Royal Enfield NO 250cc engine – CONFIRMED



The 250cc class was important in the UK as it was the largest engine which a 'learner' could ride without passing a test. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Royal Enfield produced a number of 250 cc machines, including a racer, the 'GP' and a Scrambler, the 'Moto-X', which used a modified Crusader frame, leading link forks and a Villiers Starmaker engine. The Clipper was a base-model tourer with the biggest-seller being the Crusader, a 248 cc push rod OHV single producing 18 bhp (13 kW).




In 1965, a 21 bhp (16 kW) variant called the Continental GT, with red GRP tank, five-speed gearbox (which was also an option on the Crusader), clip-on handlebars, rearset footrests, swept pipe and hump-backed seat was launched. It sold well with its race-styling including a fly-screen resembling a race number plate which doubled as a front number plate mount.


The Royal Enfield GP production-volume racer was first raced in the Manx Grand Prix in September, 1964. Developed in conjunction with Royal Enfield Racing Manager Geoff Duke the first public appearance was at Earls Court Show in November, 1964. Using a duplex-tube frame, leading link forks and one-piece tank and seat unit, the 250cc two-stroke single engine was similar to other small capacity race machines offered from rivals GreevesCottonDMW and particularly Villiers, which provided the engines for these marques and many other manufacturers and bike-builders including the 'Starmaker' competition engine used for the Scorpion racer and Sprite scrambler. Other variants were the Olympic and 250 Super 5, notable for use of leading-link front suspension (all the other 250 road models had conventional telescopic forks) and the 250 'Turbo Twin', fitted with the Villiers 247 cc twin cylinder two-stroke engine.


The Royal Enfield GP production-volume racer was first raced in the Manx Grand Prix in September, 1964. Developed in conjunction with Royal Enfield Racing Manager Geoff Duke the first public appearance was at Earls Court Show in November, 1964. Using a duplex-tube frame, leading link forks and one-piece tank and seat unit, the 250cc two-stroke single engine was similar to other small capacity race machines offered from rivals GreevesCottonDMW and particularly Villiers, which provided the engines for these marques and many other manufacturers and bike-builders including the 'Starmaker' competition engine used for the Scorpion racer and Sprite scrambler.


There have been talks that Royal Enfield will be looking at introducing two new engine platforms between 250cc-750cc, however we have a confirmed reported from someone close to the factory that there is no 250cc engine in the making.
“There is no 250cc engine in the making. Royal Enfield has taken an internal decision, to not have engines below 350cc. This is what the Enfield bikes are all about, and the company will not want to lose out on its identity,” stated the source.
Royal Enfield has given out the correct information of developing two platforms, and the two engines are 410cc and the 650cc. The 410cc is a single-cylinder engine and this will replace the 350cc in the future due to the emission norms. The 410cc will come in two states of tune, one will be with carburettor and five-speed transmission and the other one shall be the more powerful version with fuel injection and six-speed transmission. This is the first engine platform.
The second one is a 650cc, twin cylinder engine. This engine will replace the 500 and 535cc engines due to emissions. Royal Enfield has invested in two new platforms for their upcomingbikes as well, along with the Phase II construction of their Chennai plant. There shall be two R&D centres for the company, one will be in Chennai and will be a satellite centre in the UK. Royal Enfield has seen a 40 percent growth in its sales in April 2015, which is far better than most of thebike makers in the country today.
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Item Reviewed: Royal Enfield NO 250cc engine – CONFIRMED Description: Rating: 5 Reviewed By: Sheldon Dcruz
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